This is a work of fiction created for the Twilight 2000 Role Playing Game. Original material © Dave Ross

Separatist Governments

The chaos that followed the nuclear exchanges gave rise to the emergence of separatist States in both Scotland and Wales during 1999. Whilst there are a number of similarities between the two separatist Governments – both were headed by prominent members of pre war nationalist political parties and both relied heavily on the defection of soldiers from the British Territorial Army to guarantee their security – there are also a number of differences.


Perhaps the main difference between the two is that the Llywodraeth Cynulliad Cymru (or Welsh Assembly Government), is securely in control of north Wales, has no real opposition, and is supplying some of the basic functions of Government, including electricity, which is provided by the Ffestiniog hydro electric power station, whereas the Republic of Scotland’s position is considerably less secure. Not only is much of Scotland still ravaged by large numbers of marauders, but the north of the country is home to a substantial organised enclave known as the Highland Coalition. Whilst the Highland Coalition has not taken any overt steps to oppose the Republic of Scotland so far, it has rebuked attempts to form an alliance, choosing instead to ally itself with the small number of British military personnel based in northern Scotland who have remained loyal to HMG.


Consisting primarily of pre war politicians and elected community leaders, the LCC can also largely claim to be a genuinely democratic Government, whereas the National Emergency Committee (NEC) that leads the Republic of Scotland is largely self appointed (the Scots announced plans to elect a Parliament at the start of 2000, but so far no progress has been made towards this).


Finally, the Scots have welcomed overtures made by the French, and are receiving limited – and covert – support from the French, whilst the Welsh have chosen to adopted an isolationist policy, closing its border with England focusing all of their efforts inwards (although a thriving seaborne trade exists between Wales and the Republic of Ireland).


Both separatist Governments are aware that at some point in the future His Majesty’s Government will rebuild its strength and is likely to want to reunite the UK, using force if necessary. They expect it to be some time before this is likely to happen however, and at the moment any concerns that they may have about it are overshadowed by more urgent problems. Nonetheless, HMG is not going to go away, and how the separatists deal with it is likely to be their biggest challenge in the next few years. The Scots’ plan is to control as much of Scotland as they possibly can, hoping this will force HMG to recognise them as the de facto (and legitimate) Government of Scotland and reach a negotiated settlement.  


For their part, HMG have a number of Security Service officers operating inside both Wales and Scotland (several of whom are Welsh or Scottish born). These officers have managed to successfully recruit a number of agents who provide them with an ongoing source of information on the activities of both separatist Governments.